February

Nutrition Spotlight


BANANAS

Bananas are the Powerhouse of Nutrients. A banana is loaded with essential vitamins and minerals such as calcium, manganese, iron, folate, niacin, riboflavin, and B6. These all contribute to the proper functioning of the body and keeping you healthy. They contain lots of fiber, make a great snack, and are quick to grab for breakfast when heading out the door on a busy morning. Try out the recipe below for a sweet way to include bananas in your diet.

 

Ingredients
1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
3/4 cup butter, softened
1 egg
1 cup mashed ripe bananas (about 2)
1-3/4 cups quick-cooking oats
1 cup (6 ounces) semisweet chocolate chips
1/2 cup chopped walnuts

DIRECTIONS

(1) In a bowl, combine the first six ingredients; beat in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Add egg, bananas and oats; mix well. Stir in chips and nuts.

(2) Drop by tablespoonfuls onto greased baking sheets. Bake at 375° for 13-15 minutes or until golden brown. Cool on wire racks.

Nutrition Facts

2 each: 195 calories, 10g fat (5g saturated fat), 24mg cholesterol, 186mg sodium, 25g carbohydrate (14g sugars, 2g fiber), 3g protein.

Originally published as Banana Oatmeal Cookies in Taste of Home April/May 1996 – https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/banana-oatmeal-cookies/

 

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